Well I said I would.............

289, FIA & Daytona topics
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Cotton Mouth
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Cotton Mouth » Sun Sep 25, 2016 2:16 pm

Um, why didn't I use the later model? I have to confess I didn't know it existed. (Off stage vocal limbering up session for this evening). I can't see the bends collapsing due to the curvature providing increased strength and quite a lot of the hose is over joiners but the long section of 15cm or so along the back of the radiator might collapse Any suggestions for internal support suppliers? Also can you assist with the color question above please?

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Roger King
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Roger King » Sun Sep 25, 2016 3:48 pm

Good luck with this evening. Verdi Requiem? Carmina Burana? That one at least has rude Latin words in it...

Mustang lower hoses tend to come with the wire already in place, I'm not aware of any separate supplier. I think I'd go with another stretch of metal tubing.

Ah, Cobra colours. Welcome to the world of, well, who knows? There are no right or wrong answers, even down to full psychedlia, as we know.

Have a look at this:

http://www.clubcobra.com/forums/origina ... olors.html

which includes some photos of an original AC colour chip set. The only blues are quite pale metallics, which is why I chose black. I love dark blue, but it wasn't offered. Some useful stuff on colours in Rinsey Mills' Original Ace and Cobra, too.

Paul Blore
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Paul Blore » Sun Sep 25, 2016 5:02 pm

The subject of lower hoses collapsing due to suction has been raised and discussed elsewhere, but like you Roger, I'm somewhat sceptical. The cooling system is a closed circuit, under pressure once up to temperature, so I'm struggling to see how the lower hose could collapse.
I'm not saying it can't, but it does seem unlikely to me. :?

Paul

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peterc
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by peterc » Mon Sep 26, 2016 12:16 am

Ref the question on ducting the top portion of the radiator. I ran mine for quite a long time with the gap over the rad in the belief that more air going into the engine bay would assist in keeping the whole area cooler. I then made a semi elliptic shaped Ali panel to mount off the rad brackets to duct the air into the core of the rad. The water temperature dropped several degrees!
Having correctly ducted air into the radiator matrix has always got to be more efficient than just blocking off the gaps which Gerry's rad mounts basically do.
Peter C

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Cotton Mouth
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Cotton Mouth » Mon Sep 26, 2016 8:41 pm

Hello Peter, glad to see you are operating the approach of "well it seems logical and in the absence of any other reason......" Glad to hear full shrouding which deflects the air into the radiator improved cooling. Two questions, and the level of ignorance here beggars belief, when you say deflects the air do you mean the the the shrouds around the edge of the radiator extend forward of the radiator to funnel the airflow in? And second, was their a problem with hot air in the engine bay being drawn into the carburettor and did this affect the engine running? As to the paints, via Roger,these two sites may help

http://www.autopaintsbrighton.co.uk/cus ... m-46-p.asp

http://www.prestonfarm.co.uk/colour-mat ... ology.html
(For those in the north)

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peterc
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by peterc » Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:51 pm

I was never aware of any issues with hot air accumulating in the engine bay and being sucked into the carb. However I do have the FIA bonnet with a bulge so cold air could always enter in line with the filter. It's only when you stop and park that you realise how the fibreglass holds in the heat.
Air entering the front grill effectively enters a plenum or void and is not guided or ducted into the rad matrix which is the working part of the rad. Most of us merely mount the rad onto angle brackets attached to the inner wings so air is forced to change direction abruptly to get through the rad matrix. I am now considering ducting ( guiding ) the air from behind the front opening ( note I don't have a grill ) into the matrix on each side to match the ducted top surface.
My initial problem was always the way the rad was bolted in and the access to these bolts. I think I can now see a simple way of mounting the ducted sides.
Peter C

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Cotton Mouth
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Cotton Mouth » Sun Dec 25, 2016 10:40 pm

Merry Christmas all, its either enforced conversation or a post and you won. I had thought about the boot stay for a while and about the angle and whether or not there was any torsional forces on the shaft as it closed. Then there were the angles to contend with and finally I gave up and decided to rose joint both ends of the stay. I estimated where the ends of the stay would end and welded up a steel bracket with the same curve as the boot lid to distribute the upper load. This was then drilled to accept the centre portion of an M4 rose joint which was drilled M5. This is the piece sat on the heat bricks awaiting brazing.

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I then laminated some sheets of glass fibre. The rear sheet was cut to be larger than the fore sheet so the rear sheet created a piece to go up inside the lip of the boot surround. This also was drilled to accept another rose joint and bonded into place with epoxy.

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This was bonded into place behind the boot lip, filled and sanded.

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As the pivot could be stressed it was reinforced behind with a fillet placed behind the above piece and was also bonded into place.

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This is the top end of the stay which works very smoothly and with no stress to the body work.

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StewbieC
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by StewbieC » Mon Dec 26, 2016 7:13 am

Morning James,
Nice to see you are still at it and that looks like another step ticked off. Well done pal and all the best for the festive season and 2017.
________________________________________________
Stu
Hawk 289, maximum smiles per mile..

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Cotton Mouth
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Cotton Mouth » Sun Jan 08, 2017 7:58 pm

I have been having a problem with my photo bucket account that has simply ceased to work - Now using Google and I hoe the pictures work. I was also thinking for a while about routing of an earth strap back form the engine to the negative battery pole to ensure effective starting. The problem was where to earth the cable to the engine and then how to route the same avoiding the bane of my life, the hot exhaust manifolds. I selected the redundant fuel pump housing on the near side of the 289 block and made an aluminium cover - Sorry for the dreadful picture.
https://goo.gl/photos/XGCSCrKNUuJHhX5T6
The earth strap then needed to be attached to the aluminium plate using bolts that would provide means of clamping the cable. I made up from several pieces of brass plate the following and then silver soldered the result together. When the bolts are tightened the cable is clamped in the slot against the aluminium plate and the principal connection provided by the bolts which are put in with electric grease.
https://goo.gl/photos/232vzW14TDfrhC5b9
This has subsequently been modified again to have a ring on the outside to take the fuel line up the front of the block and along to the carb. The next step was to rout the cable up the side of the battery box and a piece of tube was powder coated and pop riveted to the inside of the box.
https://goo.gl/photos/qbkWW2GaEfrGkbxS7
The strap then needed securing along the top of the chassis rail with the stud proved with the chassis being the front mount
https://goo.gl/photos/GJuMvy5Vxx4krPFS7
I have also just acquired a nickel plating kit so the parts are now all coming off to have a go at that. I will put up the realists if anyone is interested.

Happy New Year to all.

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Cotton Mouth
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Re: Well I said I would.............

Post by Cotton Mouth » Sat Jan 21, 2017 4:59 am

Stewie maintains my approach to building of my car will net me the award for the longest build in club history and he may well be right. But there are reasons. When your Father writes technical articles for The Model engineer and has requests for birthday presents such as "a very interesting book on the errors in the mathematics of Stevenson's valve gear" (the irony of the remark "will I get that at WH Smiths" was lost on him) and your step father used to work on the electronics of Vulcan bombers, there is a certain pressure that the whistling of breath through teeth is not heard.

From various posts above you can see I made a number of parts out of brass sheet or steel and silver soldered or welded them up. These needed finishing before going onto the car permanently.the following is a bracket to secure the fuel line and distributor wiring, the next is the earth clamp for the block that also routes the fuel line and the last is one of the throttle arms after I polished it - my polishing is done on a bench grinder with a series of mops and abrasive media.
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I bought a plating kit from Youplate who are extremely helpful and have nice quality kit. The parts were first soaked in an acid pickle for about ten minutes, washed off and put in the degreaser. After putting the Nickel plating solution into the bucket, and heated it to 60 degrees C with a 1KW immersion heater and fired up the fish tank aerator to agitate the solution, the Nickel cathode was connected with a 7v feed and left for about 30 minutes. If you have not used a plating system before - I hadn't - the level of cleanliness you need is obsessional to get good results. It is also a bit odd as when you take the parts out they are finished - no waiting for anything to dry, set etc.
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This is some of the items after they came out
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Is this cost effective - not sure the whole lot was about £200 but I have a motorcycle to restore after this and really its a shed thing where I just sometimes want to have a go - not difficult and actually used my physics O level for the first time probably ever.

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